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Explore Proctor's on-campus academic courses, athletics, arts, college counseling, and residential life programs to better understand the breadth and depth of a Proctor experience.

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Social Science

The Social Science Department prepares students to become discerning world citizens poised for success and resilience in the college classroom.  Having acquired research and application skills, our students can analyze relevant current issues, work collaboratively, synthesize critically and communicate effectively. Social Science Department graduates have the confidence to take risks, respectfully build connections, and make meaningful contributions within their communities.

 
Students are required to complete eight social science credits to meet graduation requirements, including one full year of World History and one full year of United States History.
  • AP Government (1)

    DESIGNATION: Level I elective

    GOALS
    : A logical sequel to the fall term of regular U.S. History, the goal of this college level course is to have the students develop an informed perspective on government and politics in the United States. Students analyze specific examples that highlight the general concepts by which U.S. politics are interpreted, develop a familiarity with the institutions, groups, beliefs and ideas that comprise U.S. politics, are exposed to different theories explaining political behaviors and outcomes, and prepare for the Advanced Placement examination for college credit at the end of the term.

    MATERIAL COVERED:
    This course examines the following major subject areas: constitutional underpinnings of U.S. government, political beliefs and behaviors, institutions of national government, public policy – domestic and foreign, civil rights, and civil liberties.

    TEXT:
    American Government and Politics Today, West Wadsworth

    PREREQUISITE:
    U.S. History and departmental approval.
     
  • AP Human Geography (1)

    DESIGNATION: Level I elective
     
    GOALS: The AP Human Geography course introduces students to the ways in which man's understanding and decisions have been shaped by the Earth, as well as the way in which man has developed and altered the Earth’s surface. Students analyze maps and use spatial data to examine the effects of man's decisions on the environment, and vice versa. Students will also be taught the techniques and tools that geographers use in their practice. The ultimate goal of this class is to empower students to understand and develop models to solve problems that have occurred between man and his environment. This course culminates with the AP Human Geography exam taken in May. Throughout the year students will be preparing for the exam by practicing AP type multiple choice questions, as well as constructing and writing free response essays that satisfy the College Board standards for essay writing. To stimulate interest and develop soft skills, students frequently collaborate with peers to develop creative presentations on current problems. Students enrolled in the class for the full year will be expected to take this exam in lieu of an in-class spring examination.
     
    MATERIAL COVERED: According to the College Board Introduction to AP Human Geography, this course will allow students to “use and think about maps and spatial data, understand and interpret the implications of associations among phenomena in places, recognize and interpret at different scales the relationships among patterns and processes, define regions and evaluate the regionalization process, and characterize and analyze interconnections among places.” Specifically, the following topics are examined on a global scale: Basic Concepts, Population and Health, Migration, Language, Religion, Ethnicity, Political Geography, Agriculture, Development, Industry, Urban, Services.
     
    TEXT: The Cultural Landscape: An Introduction to Human Geography (12th edition), James M. Rubenstein, as well as selected articles and readings.
     
    PREREQUISITE: U.S. History and departmental approval.
  • AP US History (1)

    DESIGNATION: Level I elective with department approval
    GOALS: This is a college-level course designed to give students a thorough grounding in the study of United States history and to prepare them to take the national Advanced Placement examination in May. Historical writing skills are strengthened through a program of writing assignments that includes analytical, interpretive, and researched essays.
    MATERIAL COVERED: The course provides a chronological and thematic coverage of United States' political, economic, social and cultural development. The fall term begins with the British and French settlement of the New World and ends with our quest for Manifest Destiny in the 1840s. The winter term covers the political turmoil of the 1850s and concludes with the failure of the Versailles Treaty. The spring term picks up with the 1920s and strives to reach the mid-1970s by the date of the exam. The spring term also includes a guided review and extra class study sessions to prepare for the national exam.

    TEXT:
    Materials used vary each term according to the study group. Examples of recent materials include: American History: A Survey, Excellence in US History, and selected Primary Documents.
     
    PREREQUISITE:  U.S. History
  • Comparative Religion I

    DESIGNATION: Level I elective (Fall, Winter, Spring)

    GOALS:
    This course is a comparative study of the basic patterns of religion. Students seek to illuminate the field of religious study through analysis and inquisition. The course will focus on such themes as religious experience, myths of creative, stories of religious founders and heroes, the origin and resolution of human suffering, and the structure and meaning of religious community and ritual. There will be critical examination of some of the most influential modern proponents and opponents of religious faith, with special emphasis on the question of what is involved in belief in God/gods and what spurs the origin and success of religion? Upon completion of the course, students will exit the classroom with a strong foundation in major world religions from geographical, historical, literary, cultural, ethical, and political perspectives.

    MATERIAL COVERED:
    Basic questions of human existence are addressed by religion: the meaning and purpose of life; the presence of death, sorrow, and anxiety; the existence of God/gods; questions of morality and justice; and, the possibilities of transcendence, salvation, peace, and liberation for individuals and communities. The academic study of religion explores how religion shapes culture and thought, forms values, and compels human action. Students selecting a term of the Comparative Religion course, whatever their ultimate vocation might turn out to be, find themselves equipped to navigate skillfully in our culturally pluralistic, diverse world.

    TEXT: God Is Not One: The Eight Rival Religions That Run the World – and Whey Their Differences Matter, Stephen Prothero and The Dharma Bums, Jack Kerouac


    PREREQUISITE
    : U.S. History
     
  • Culture and Conflict (Hon)

    DESIGNATION:  Level 1 (Fall)     
                              This course is designed to be scheduled along with English Seminar:  Culture and Conflict  resulting in one English Credit PLUS one Social Science credit for the term.

    GOALS:   In this course, students will explore themes involving the family, politics, war, alienation, gender, migration, and issues of cultural assimilation.  The aim is to explore cultures and ensuing conflicts from the perspective of various ethnic/racial/national backgrounds and to investigate how people of differing environments make ethical decisions during times of desperation. Students will be examining nonfiction work/critical essays, primary- source historical images, film, political cartoons and music that help provide frameworks for considering how literature reflects conflict, provides possible opportunities to resolve conflicts, as well as reveals the varying ways in which members of various cultural groups have responded to conflict.

    By delving into such areas of strife, we will strengthen our ability to empathize with those who have not had their stories heard in the past and consider how that might impact our relationships today.


    TEXTS:  Texts will relate to Native American/Indigenous peoples; Revolutions in the Caribbean and Latin America; War and Conflict in Southeast Asia, Africa, and Europe.
     
  • EAC History

    COURSE:  EUROPEAN HISTORY
    Prerequisite:  For students doing an off-campus term in Europe
    only
     
    GOALS AND MATERIAL COVERED:  This class covers pivotal historic events in Europe, such as the fall of the Roman Empire, the Reign of Terror, the Inquisition, and the creation of the European Union. We focus on the artistic expression born from each era using field trips to distinct locations to augment and enhance our regular classroom studies. Learning destinations may include, but are not limited to: Florence for the birth of the Renaissance and the Age of Popes; Paris for the Revolution, the Impressionists, and Henri Matisse; and Belgium for the Golden Age, the Belle Epoque, and the ravages of both world wars.  Each student engages in a research project, writes regular critical papers, and gives a formal presentation. Documentary and cultural films, current events, and slide identification round out this course.
     
    TEXT: Fleming’s Arts and Ideas, Wadsworth Publishing, 4th edition.
  • Economics I

    DESIGNATION: Level I elective (Fall, Winter)

    GOALS: To allow students to explore the concept of how the marketplace helps consumers be as well off as possible while allowing producers to maximize profits all because of scarce economic resources.

    MATERIAL COVERED: The fall term of Economics provides an introduction to microeconomic theory and policy through a foundational discussion of supply and demand principles. Students will gain a valuable understanding of price determination in product, and factor markets by studying the behavior of individuals and firms in relation to cost structures. Students will then apply this knowledge to an exploration of economic efficiency in various market structures, including both perfect and imperfect competition. A culminating research project will challenge students to integrate content from the entire course as they prepare a business plan for a startup company of their choosing and present it to a panel of investors. The winter term of Economics provides an introduction to macroeconomic theory and policy through an underlying discussion of economic growth. Students will study the aggregate economy by studying historical economic instabilities within the United States, and their impact on inflation, GDP, unemployment, and national income. Students will then examine the role of government agencies in addressing that instability through both fiscal and monetary policies, before engaging in a large-scale research project in which they develop their own policy on the future of economic growth in the United States. The spring term of Economics explores current issues in economics with a wide range of topics facing both the United States and foreign markets in the 21st century. Within the context of late 20th century globalization, students will investigate the current international economic situation and the role America plays in the worldwide economy. Through an intent focus on emerging markets and emerging technologies, students will use case studies, current event research, and independent research projects to guide their exploration of current issues in economics, seeking to gain a better understanding of the potential for economic growth worldwide in the century ahead.

    TEXT: Economics – 17th edition, McConnell

    PREREQUISITE: U.S. History
     
  • Economics II

    DESIGNATION: Level I elective (Fall, Winter)
     
    GOALS: To allow students to explore the concept of how the marketplace helps consumers be as well off as possible while allowing producers to maximize profits all because of scarce economic resources.
     
    MATERIAL COVERED:
    •The fall term of Economics 1 provides an introduction to microeconomic theory and policy through a foundational discussion of supply and demand principles. Students will gain a valuable understanding of price determination in product, and factor markets by studying the behavior of individuals and firms in relation to cost structures. Students will then apply this knowledge to an exploration of economic efficiency in various market structures, including both
    perfect and imperfect competition. A culminating research project will challenge students to integrate content from the entire course as they prepare a business plan for a startup company of their choosing and present it to a panel of investors.
    •The winter term of Economics 2 provides an introduction to macroeconomic theory and policy through an underlying discussion of economic growth. Students will study the aggregate economy by studying historical economic instabilities within the United States, and their impact on inflation, GDP, unemployment, and national income. Students will then examine the role of government agencies in addressing that instability through both fiscal and monetary policies, before engaging in a large-scale research project in which they develop their own policy on the future of economic growth in the United States.
     
    TEXT: Economics – 17th edition, McConnell
     
    PREREQUISITE: U.S. History
     
    -----------------------------------------------------
     
    COURSE: Globalization
     
    DESIGNATION: Level I elective (Fall, Winter, Spring)
     
    GOALS: This course is an upper-level elective where students will study the consequences of globalization, both positive and negative. They will begin to see how globalization effects not only natural environments, but also environments as defined by politics, religion, and culture. Students will be expected to think critically, evaluate sources, ask questions and develop their writing and literacy skills.
     
    MATERIAL COVERED: Students will learn about the colonial roots of multinational debt, privatization of natural resources, the IMF and World Bank, the distribution of wealth, environmental history, civic democracy, child labor, genetically modified food, and hunger.
     
    TEXT: Fall: Let the Mountain Talk, Let the Rivers Run, David Brower; Winter: Savages, Joe Kane,; Spring: Foodfight: The Citizen's Guide to the Food and Farm Bill, Imhoff & Pollan
     
    PREREQUISITE: U.S. History
  • European History I

    DESIGNATION: Level I Elective (Fall, Winter, Spring)
     
    GOALS: This course is an upper- level elective that explores the political, economic, cultural and social conflicts and successes of the European continent beginning with the Renaissance and ending with the Cold War. The subject matter will be devoted to primary-source cultural history texts, images, and documents that will enable students to raise the kinds of questions that many historians grapple with today concerning cultivation of prosperity and creativity, religious strife, allegiance to ones country, striving for self preservation and citizens’ rights, and the ability to make ethical decisions during times of desperation. The aim of this course is to not simply gloss over broad themes and topics, but rather to delve into the complexities and challenges that have not only transformed the continent but the entire world.
     
    MATERIAL COVERED: In the fall we will explore the Renaissance (exploration, painting, architecture, spread of knowledge), the Protestant Reformation, and the Enlightenment. In the winter we will examine the French and Haitian Revolutions and their connection as well as Industrialization, and European colonization/ imperialism. And in the spring we will look at the causes and effects of WWI/ WWII, the Russian Revolutions, and the spread of Anti-Semitism in regards to the Holocaust.
     
    TEXT: A History of Modern Europe, Third Edition, John Merriman; A History of Western Society, Twelfth Edition, John McKay; Brown University Choices Curriculum: The French Revolution and The Haitian Revolution; Night, Elie Wiesel
     
    PREREQUISITE: US History 
  • European History II

    DESIGNATION: Level I Elective (Fall, Winter, Spring)
     
    GOALS: This course is an upper- level elective that explores the political, economic, cultural and social conflicts and successes of the European continent beginning with the Renaissance and ending with the Cold War. The subject matter will be devoted to primary-source cultural history texts, images, and documents that will enable students to raise the kinds of questions that many historians grapple with today concerning cultivation of prosperity and creativity, religious strife, allegiance to ones country, striving for self preservation and citizens’ rights, and the ability to make ethical decisions during times of desperation. The aim of this course is to not simply gloss over broad themes and topics, but rather to delve into the complexities and challenges that have not only transformed the continent but the entire world.
     
    MATERIAL COVERED: In the fall we will explore the Renaissance (exploration, painting, architecture, spread of knowledge), the Protestant Reformation, and the Enlightenment. In the winter we will examine the French and Haitian Revolutions and their connection as well as Industrialization, and European colonization/ imperialism. And in the spring we will look at the causes and effects of WWI/ WWII, the Russian Revolutions, and the spread of Anti-Semitism in regards to the Holocaust.
     
    TEXT: A History of Modern Europe, Third Edition, John Merriman; A History of Western Society, Twelfth Edition, John McKay; Brown University Choices Curriculum: The French Revolution and The Haitian Revolution; Night, Elie Wiesel
     
    PREREQUISITE: US History 
  • Foundations of American Democracy

    American Government and Politics- Foundations of American Democracy

    DESIGNATION:  Level I elective (Winter)

    GOALS:  
    American Government and Politics - Foundations of American Democracy is a Winter term class that not only seeks to prepare students for success in a college level course, but also provide students with the political knowledge and reasoning processes to participate meaningfully and thoughtfully in discussions and debates that are currently shaping American politics and society. It is important to note that this course is not a history course; it is a political science course that studies the interconnectedness of the different parts of the American political system and the behaviors and attitudes that shape this system and are the byproduct of this system.

    This class accomplishes these goals by framing the acquisition of political knowledge around essential concepts and larger themes about American government and politics. By the end of the course, students will be able to analyze current and historical political events like a political scientist and develop factually accurate, well-reasoned, thoughtful arguments and opinions that acknowledge and grapple with alternative political perspectives.


    TEXT:  Books:  Edwards, George C. Government in America: People, Politics, and Policy. 17th Ed. Chicago 2018, Pearson. [CR16]

    Reader:           Serow, Ann and Ladd, Everett. The Lanahan Readings in the American Polity. 6th Ed. Baltimore 2016, Lanahan
    Review Text:    Wolfford, David. United States Government and Politics. 2nd Ed. 2018 Amsco Press.
  • Gender Studies Skills

    DESIGNATION: Level II elective (Fall, Winter, Spring)
     
    GOALS: Classes will be based on articles from newspapers, magazines, online forums, and more. There will be TED talks, interviews, Youtube videos, shows, and more to watch. The purpose is to generate conversation on topics that are rarely discussed. This class is intended to inform and educate our upper class members on issues facing them everyday. Topics can be changed to reflect the results of our schools gender survey results. Some topics are wellness related.  Discussions will be geared towards both wellness and gender.
     
    MATERIAL COVERED:  The big questions:  what is gender, what is identity?  Issues that will be discussed: men verses women, body image, media influence, relationships & dating, rape culture, bullying and change.
  • Globalization I

    DESIGNATION: Level I elective (Fall, Winter, Spring)
     
    GOALS: This course is an upper-level elective where
    students will study the consequences of globalization,
    both positive and negative. They will begin to see how
    globalization effects not only natural environments, but
    also environments as defined by politics, religion, and
    culture. Students will be expected to think critically,
    evaluate sources, ask questions and develop their writing
    and literacy skills.

     MATERIAL COVERED: Students will learn about the
    colonial roots of multinational debt, privatization of
    natural resources, the IMF and World Bank, the
    distribution of wealth, environmental history, civic
    democracy, child labor, genetically modified food, and
    hunger.

     TEXT: Fall: Let the Mountain Talk, Let the Rivers Run,
    David Brower; Winter: Savages, Joe Kane,; Spring:
    Foodfight: The Citizen's Guide to the Food and Farm
    Bill, Imhoff & Pollan

    PREREQUISITE: U.S. History
  • Human Rights, Citizens of the World I

    DESIGNATION: Level I elective (Fall & Winter)

    GOALS
    : The idea that each individual possesses a set of rights that society and government are obligated to respect and protect is the foundation of this course. In theory, human rights are independent of geography, political borders, or cultural heritage. This class looks at the historical development of human rights, the evolution of the protection of individual rights, and the influence of human rights on past, current, and future United States foreign policy. The course uses historical materials, primary source readings, and student role-play materials to explore these issues. The students create their own theories, write up U.S. policy options, and explore civil rights and humanitarian issues of personal interest.

    MATERIAL COVERED:
    Some of the topics covered include the history of slavery, human rights in Brazil, India's Independence, Apartheid in South Africa, and the role of human rights in determining future of U. S. foreign policy. Some of the readings included in the course are selections of Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., Primo Levi, Wei Jongsheng, and other important figures in human rights history.

    TEXT:
    Selected readings from Citizens of the World: Readings in Human Rights, Great Books Foundation, as well as selections from the Choices Foundation courtesy of the Watson Institute at Brown University.

    PREREQUISITE:
    U.S. History
     

  • Intro to Anthropology I

    DESIGNATION: Level 1 elective (Fall term, odd years):
    ·      Odd Years: Intro to Anthropology
    ·      Even Years: Area and Case Studies
    US History is a prerequisite. Students that have taken Anthropology before Case Studies (or vice versa) will have a stronger understanding of the material and an ability to delve deeper into the class concepts.
     
    GOALS:  Students will be engaged in conversations that take them away from the worlds and circles they are comfortable with. They will explore cultures and concepts that are conspicuously lacking in the general social science curriculum and delve deeply into ethnographies, resulting in a broadened understanding of what it means to be human.
     
    Anthropology is commonly referred to as the science of humanity, and is the study of humans, past and present.  To understand the full sweep and complexity of cultures across human history, anthropology draws and builds upon knowledge from the social and biological sciences as well as the humanities and physical sciences.  A central concern of Anthropologists is the application of knowledge to the solution of human problems. Historically, anthropologists in the United States have been trained in one of four areas: cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, archaeology, and linguistics.  Anthropologists often integrate the perspectives of several of these areas into their research, teaching, and professional lives.
              
    MATERIALS COVERED--Trimester I:
         Archaeology
         Dendrochronology
         Carbon 14 Dating
         Excavation and Stratigraphy
         LIDAR
     
    TEXT:  none
  • Introduction to Philosophy

    Designation:  Level 11, 12 & PG elective 

    GOALS:  The word “philosophy” comes from the Greek philo, meaning “love of,” and sophia, meaning “wisdom.”  This course will introduce students to some of the major topics in the field of Philosophy, including but not limited to the areas of metaphysics, ethics, identity, religion, aesthetics, politics, and society.  Students will tackle a few of the major topics like mind and body problem, free will and determinism, the existence of God, and the nature of truth.  The intent is not only to survey major topics in the field, but also to practice the process, and ignite a “love of,” inquiry, analysis, critical thinking, and reflection.  Students will read original texts from philosophers like Plato, Aristotle, Saint Anselm, Rene Descartes, Bertrand Russell, Daniel Dennett, Soren Kierkegaard, Jean-Paul Sartre, Karl Marx and others.  They will also get the chance to listen to, and question, various class visitors (philosophers, artists, and scientists) throughout the term.  This elective class is open to juniors and seniors who are interested in “diving deeply” into difficult concepts and texts.
  • Modern Middle Eastern History

    DESIGNATION: Level I elective (Fall)

    GOALS
    : This course focuses on the people, religions, history, politics, and conflicts that have dominated this volatile region from the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948 to the present. This is a region teeming with drama: wars, assassinations, terrorism, fanaticism, and shifting alliances. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is at the heart of the on-going crisis, but the effects of the Iranian Revolution and the rise and fall of Saddam Hussein's Iraq also figure prominently. Students are required to write a 7-10 page research paper on the impact of an event or individual from this era.

    MATERIAL COVERED:
    Events in Turkey, Palestine, Syria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and Iran are closely examined, as well as the relationships between these nations and the major western powers. The establishment of the state of Israel in 1948 and its impact on relationships in the region is an area of major emphasis.

    TEXT:
    A History of the Modern Middle East, William L. Cleveland

    PREREQUISITE:
    U.S. History
     
  • Mountain Classroom/Social Science

     
    GOALS AND MATERIAL COVERED: The Mountain Classroom Social Science course provides students an opportunity to explore real-world issues in the environment where they are occurring. The course focuses on the regional and cultural issues pertinent to the areas that the Mountain Classroom group visits. Through readings, interviews and first hand observations, students are able to develop a thorough understanding and form personal opinions regarding the topics discussed in the course.
     
    ASSESSMENTS: All assignments are hand written in a composition notebook that is collected and graded periodically.  These notebooks include reflections on readings and interviews that students conduct throughout the term. Students are additionally assessed on their participation in our class discussions and completion of a study guide that is geared toward synthesizing and organizing their research, interviews and observations. The course culminates with a final exam.
     
    TEXT: As the course may switch its main focus term to term, the reading similarly varied. The following is an example of books and resources that have been used in recent years: The Devil’s Highway by Luis Alberto Urrea, Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan, Collapse by Jared Diamond, The Earth Shall Weep by James Wilson, God is Not One by Stephen Prothero, Enrique’s Journey by Sonia Nazario, Black Elk Speaks byJohn Neihardt,
    Articles from: New York Times, The Economist, NPR, High Country News, Newsweek,
    local news sources, etc...
     
  • Ocean Classroom-History

    Prerequisite:  For students doing an off-campus term in Ocean Classroom
    only
  • Political Institutions and Elections

    American Government and Politics- Foundations of American Democracy

    DESIGNATION:  Level I elective (Spring)

    GOALS:  
    American Government and Politics - Political Institutions and Elections is a Spring  term class that not only seeks to prepare students for success in a college level course, but also provide students with the political knowledge and reasoning processes to participate meaningfully and thoughtfully in discussions and debates that are currently shaping American politics and society. Building upon the foundations of government, this course looks more deeply at the inner workings of the US government by analyzing political institutions, the electorate, media, and elections. It is important to note that this course is not a history course; it is a political science course that studies the interconnectedness of the different parts of the American political system and the behaviors and attitudes that shape this system and are the byproduct of this system.

    This class accomplishes these goals by framing the acquisition of political knowledge around essential concepts and larger themes about American government and politics. By the end of the course, students will be able to analyze current and historical political events like a political scientist and develop factually accurate, well-reasoned, thoughtful arguments and opinions that acknowledge and grapple with alternative political perspectives.


    TEXT:  Books:  Edwards, George C. Government in America: People, Politics, and Policy. 17th Ed. Chicago 2018, Pearson. [CR16]
    Reader:           Serow, Ann and Ladd, Everett. The Lanahan Readings in the American Polity. 6th Ed. Baltimore 2016, Lanahan
    Review Text:    Wolfford, David. United States Government and Politics. 2nd Ed. 2018 Amsco Press.
  • Psychology I

    DESIGNATION: Level I elective (Fall, Winter, Spring)

    GOALS:
    The first term of this course is an introduction into psychology that provides the students with a basic understanding of the major topics in psychology. “Why do we do what we do?” is the question that lies beneath a lot of the inquiries that people ask of psychologists. Using the textbook as the framework for class content, the fall term promotes a passionate appreciation for the exploration of human understanding, mental processing, and behavior. The second term of this course is about your past, your future, and who you are now. It’s about your parents and grandparents, friends, and the children you expect to have. If you plan to work with children, adults, or older people, this will give you an important foundation for your future. Starting with the first minutes in the womb, you will get a motion picture of the changes during a human life from a cognitive, physical, and socio-emotional perspective. In addition to classroom visits from people in each life stage, students will be working throughout the term on a documentary film. Students will demonstrate an understanding of each stage in the lifespan based on the life story of one specific person of their choosing. The third term of this course identifies and then studies the major determinants that shape one’s sense of self. Who are you – what factors define and determine you? Further, what makes people different? With a psychological lens, we will highlight and examine the key factors and categories that make “me” different from “you.” This discussion-based term explores gender, religion, ethnicity, family dynamics, morality, class, education, and consciousness, as well as the most notable psychological experiments of modern times. Students will be required to make multiple presentations on recent research in psychology and deliver personal speeches throughout the course of the term. In addition to deepening one’s sense of self, students will refine critical thinking skills as well as the confidence to present one’s perspectives to a group of their peers. Throughout the three terms, using a variety of assessment methods, this course will further develop excellence in written and oral communication, and also develop research, presentation, and multimedia communication techniques in relation to psychology.

    MATERIAL COVERED:
    Some of the topics covered include psychology’s roots and history, neuroscience and consciousness, lifespan development, gender and sexuality, learning, memory, personality, motivation, and topics in abnormal psychology, as well as developmental theory as it relates to the following life stages: pregnancy, infancy, childhood, adolescence, early and middle adulthood, and later life. Within each life stage, this course will be studying the work of the following prominent psychologists: Piaget, Erikson, Kohlberg and Freud.

    TEXT:
    Fall: Psychology in Everyday Life, David G. Myers; Winter: Experiencing the Lifespan, 2nd Edition, Janet Belsky; Spring: Course readings may include excerpts from some of the following: The Selfish Gene, Richard Dawkins, Raising Cain, Dan Kindlon & Michael Thompson, The Virtue of Selfishness, Ayn Rand, Understanding Poverty, Ruby Payne, The Nurture Assumption, Judith Harris, The Magical Child, Joseph Pierce, and On the Side of the Child, William Ayers.

    PREREQUISITE:
    U.S. History
     
  • Social Entrepreneurship

    DESIGNATION: Level I elective (Fall)
     
    GOALS:  Employing an experiential, multidisciplinary, challenge-based learning approach, students research causes of poverty, raise money, and identify a sustainable project which has the potential to lift an individual or community out of poverty. Students then invest in the project and track the efficacy of the investment. A culminating research paper and presentation, outlining each student’s poverty alleviation project, represent a significant mechanism for assessment. Meetings with social entrepreneurs, and organizations such as ACCION, Oxfam, Harvard Center for International Development, the University of New Hampshire Sustainable Microenterpise and Development Program, and Women’s Trust, provide perspective and exposure to initiatives as well as valuable networking opportunities.
     
    MATERIAL COVERED: Foundational topics include: poverty; colonialism, post-colonialism and colonial “residue”; the power structures of capitalism; information technology and globalization; welfare, charity and charitable giving; gender and the psychology of employment/unemployment.
     
    TEXTS: Readings may include, but are not limited to: Banker To The Poor: Micro-Lending and the Battle Against World Poverty; A Billion Bootstraps: Microcredit, Barefoot Banking, and The Business Solution for Ending Poverty; The Social Entrepreneur’s Handbook; The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good
     
    SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS AND VIDEOS:
    Short readings and videos will be utilized to augment selections from the courses’ main readings depending upon the direction the class takes following research and adoption of a poverty alleviation project.
  • US History (1)

    DESIGNATION: Level I requirement
     
    GOALS: This course provides students a thorough understanding of the central events, issues, ideas and people that have shaped the United States. Material is presented to include the history of all Americans, not merely the record of those in power. In addition to studying the history of the United States, this course fosters better organizational, analytical, and research skills to improve students' written and oral work. The overarching goal is to give students the skill set and the national literacy to become problem solvers in the 21st century.
     
    MATERIAL COVERED: U.S. History is divided into three terms of study. The fall trimester begins with an analysis of the origins of the Revolution. Particular emphasis is placed on the social, religious, economic, and political factors that influence the evolution of American democracy. Next, the Constitution and Bill of Rights are studied in depth, with special attention placed on our three branch/checks and balance system, the election process, how bills become laws, judicial review, and landmark Supreme Court decisions. 
    In the winter term, classes focus on the period of manifest destiny and commensurate growing sectionalism that leads us to the Civil War. Teachers then look at the period of  Reconstruction and its unfinished business that a civil rights movement 100 years later sought to correct.  
    In the spring term we utilize teaching “loops” to mostly explore the United States in the international community during the 20th and 21st centuries.  A teaching “loop” begins with the examination of a current challenge that we as a nation face.  Next, teachers and students explore the history of that challenge from a designated starting point up to modern day.  Then, students prepare a solution for that challenge by writing policy papers and/or delivering oral presentations.  
     
    TEXT: The Americans, McDougal Littell, and a variety of texts based on thematic selection, primary documents, current newspapers, and periodicals.
  • US History (1) (Hon)

    DESIGNATION: Level I. 
              (US History is required, Honors is optional.)
     
    GOALS: This course provides students a thorough understanding of the central events, issues, ideas, and people that have shaped the United States. Material is presented to include the history of many Americans, not merely the record of those in power. In addition to studying the history of the United States, this course fosters better organizational, analytical, and research skills to improve students' written and oral work.
    MATERIAL COVERED: U.S. History is divided into three terms of study. The fall trimester begins with an analysis of the origins of the Revolution. Particular emphasis is placed on the social, religious, economic, and political factors that influence the evolution of American democracy. Next, the Constitution and Bill of Rights are studied in depth, with special attention placed on our three branch/checks and balance system, the election process, how bills become laws, judicial review, and landmark Supreme Court decisions. The winter term examines the period of manifest destiny and the political tensions that came with the acquisition of new territories in the west. After linking this period with the cause of the Civil War, Reconstruction is explored through the lens of unfinished business or racial equality. Finally, the winter term is concluded with the Civil Rights Movement of the second half of the 20th Century that addresses that unfinished business from a century before. The spring terms explores the United States 20th Century role on the world stage, from conflicts with Spain, Europe, and in Asia.
    In the Honors Section, the standards by which student work is evaluated are more demanding. The course topics are explored in greater depth through the use of primary documents and secondary sources. Furthermore, in the Honors section students might teach class by leading discussions.
     
    TEXT: The Americans, McDougal Littell and a variety of texts based on thematic selection, primary documents, current newspapers, and periodicals.
     
    PREREQUISITE: Department recommendation and department chair's approval.
  • World History (1)

    World History Course Description
    DESIGNATION: Level I

    Goals: The goal of the World History curriculum is to develop the skills needed for later in-depth historical inquiry and research. Throughout the year, students will work on reading comprehension, analysis, and synthesizing information into persuasive verbal and written arguments. Library and Internet research skills will also be a class focus. Students will practice these analytical skills while looking at a variety of historical events and cultures.
     
    Material Covered: 
    To understand the Afroeurasian roots of North American history and to prepare students for United States History’s content and skill-set demands on tenth or eleventh grade students, ninth grade students take our year-long World History class on the Great Global Convergence from 1400 to 1800. 
     
    Fall Term: We begin the year learning how the once disparate regions of the world became linked by transoceanic travel. The Columbian Exchange brought American crops, including maize, tobacco, and potatoes, to Europe, while sugar and cotton, originating in Afroeurasia, made their way to the Americas. Microorganisms from Afroeurasia decimated the indigenous populations of the Americas in the “Great Dying.” 
     
    Winter Term: Afroeurasians, mainly free Europeans and African slaves, interacted with Americans as they settled the Atlantic Rim. A global economy emerged, funded by silver mined in the Americas, which elevated Europe as the center of the world economy by 1800. The steady growth of European military might, fueled by the development of gunpowder and military technology, and political power ushered in ways to generate tax revenue to pay for wars of conquest. 
     
    Spring Term: The Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment expanded man’s ability to understand the world and to manipulate nature. Man’s place in the world, augmented by the ability to reason, challenged long-standing religious and philosophical perspectives and redefined governments’ role in protecting the emerging rights of man. 
     
    Text: “World History for Us All is a national collaboration of K-12 teachers, collegiate instructors, and educational technology specialists. It is a project of San Diego State University in cooperation with the National Center for History in the Schools at UCLA. ” Other readings augment the offerings of this program.

Faculty

  • Geoffrey Sahs

    Social Science Department Chair
    603-735-6633
  • Brooks Bicknell

    Arts and Social Science Departments, Spain & Costa Rica Programs Coordinator
    603-735-6802
    Bio
  • Kyle Connolly

    Social Science Department
    603-735-6634
    Bio
  • Timothy Denoncour

    Recreational/Developmental Ski Coach
    603-735-6685
  • Ryan Graumann

    Co-Director of Proctor in Segovia
    011-34-638-865-646
    Bio
  • Kelly Griffin-Brown

    Athletic Trainer / Social Science Faculty
    603-735-6677
    Bio
  • Brooke Haynes

    Social Science Faculty / Points Administrator
    603-735-6634
    Bio
  • Adam Jones

    Technology Chair and Integration Specialist/Social Science Department
    603-735-6635
    Bio
  • Gregor Makechnie

    Director of Athletics/Boys' Basketball
    603-735-6671
    Bio
  • Melanie Maness

    English and Social Science Faculty/Girls' Tennis
    603-735-6628
    Bio
  • John Miller

    603-735-6632
  • Fiona Mills

    English and Social Science Departments / Multicultural Coordinator
    603-735-6628
    Bio
  • Caroline Murphy

    Social Science Department
    603-735-6634
    Bio
Located in  Andover, NH,  Proctor Academy is a private coeducational day and boarding school for grades 912. Students benefit from a rigorous academic program, experiential off-campus programs, fine and performing arts, competitive athletics, and a wide selection of extracurricular activities.
204 Main Street  .  PO Box 500  .  Andover, NH 03216
p. (603) 735-6000   f. (603) 735-6300   webmaster@proctoracademy.org